Computer Ethics: Its Necessity and Its Integration into the Curriculum

Marion Ben-Jacob,* Department of Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Mercy College, USA

Abstract

Technological advances of this millennium have enabled enhanced learning experiences for students. Technology has and continues to be integrated into the educational environment from many perspectives and to different degrees. However, to facilitate the appropriate use of the power of technology in student learning, we need to integrate the study of computer ethics into the curriculum. This paper addresses the importance of computer ethics and discusses methodology and pedagogy that support student engagement, student-faculty teamwork, student assessment of the quality of the instruction, and the learning of this essential subject.

Keywords: student engagement, assessment, instructional technology, academic integrity

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Gamification for Enhancing Student Motivation: Research Reflections

Richard Taylor, Higher Colleges of Technology, United Arab Emirates

Abstract

Gamification is the application of game elements (such as rewards, rapid feedback cycles, and competition elements) to a non-game context in order to motivate users and engage them in activities that they would otherwise find boring. It is exactly this aspect of gamification that has attracted the attention of educators seeking to design learning experiences that can engage learners and increase their motivation on a cognitive, emotional and social level. My research project aims to evaluate the effectiveness of gamification on higher education students’ engagement, motivation and academic attainment. This is a research project in progress, so in this paper I will describe the rationale for the study, the theoretical framework, the methodology, and the expected outcomes.

Keywords: gamification, assessment, student engagement, ESL instruction

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The Applicability of Speech Act Analysis to Course Evaluation: A Small-Scale Pilot Study

Alison Devine, Edge Hill University, UK

Abstract

The current paper has both a substantive and methodological focus. Substantively, it finds that the online discussion board postings of students enrolled on a postgraduate certificate in teaching and learning display evidence of students’ applying course studies in their workplace, but that these displays are mostly limited to comments regarding their own physical activities and (affective) approaches, rather than any attempt to disseminate their learning any more widely. Methodologically then, this paper argues that speech act analysis (SAA) can be of partial use to the course evaluator who is seeking evidence of an impact on practice as one means of triangulating data, but that there are three types of evidence of impact on practice apparent in the students’ online postings and a detailed understanding of these types can aid in enhancing student learning.
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Innovations in the Traditional Chinese University Classroom

Shaobin Ji, Wenzhou Vocational and Technical College, Wenzhou, China

Abstract

Traditionally, the Chinese classroom has been a place where lecturers transmit knowledge to learners. However, with the revolution in modern information technology, the traditional Chinese classroom has been systematically replaced by a virtual and multiple-function classroom where students and their instructors have more opportunity to exchange views on topics jointly set by the learners and instructors. So far the so-called “three-in–one classroom” has emerged from cooperation between higher learning institutions and their industrial counterparts. This paper addresses some critical issues related to this new pedagogical approach, where students are much more actively involved in industrial production as well as in traditional learning. It touches on issues concerning teaching effectiveness, assessment, the changing role of teachers, integrating textbooks with information available online or in the workplace, and the complementary roles of faculty and industry experts in student training.
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Students’ Attitudes towards Modes of Evaluation

Mordechai Miron, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to determine the attitudes of Israeli students towards different modes of evaluation. The Sample consisted of 346 undergraduate students who were enrolled in six different faculties. The instrument used in the study was a questionnaire. The analysis of the data indicated that there were significant differences among students’ attitudes from different faculties towards each mode of evaluation.
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Re-Engineering the Teaching and Learning Process with Specific Reference to Management Education

Lakshmivarahan Ramasubramani, Acharya Bangalore B School, India

Abstract

More often, the decision makers from the industry are not all that delighted when they visit management education institutes for placement. The industry, the institute, and the students can be treated as sides of an equilateral triangle. All three are equally responsible for this kind of scenario. The author proposes a thorough revamp of the entire process, which would start with reverse communication from industries to institutes and meaningful participation from industries. The author also proposes more fun and humor-filled teaching. An attempt is made in this paper to study in detail the various re-engineering practices that can be adopted to change the way we look at management education, especially with respect to the Indian scenario.
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“Please Sir, I Want Some More” – MORE! Oliver Twist in the 21st century

Andrew Sackville Edge Hill University, UK

Abstract

Are resources for learning really diminishing? Where does most of our learning take place? What are the resources we actually use? This paper questions the conventional views of “diminished resources”, “learning” and “resources” and argues for the recognition of the learning that takes place both within and outside the workplace. Using two small case studies from very different areas – clinical education and heritage learning – the paper focuses on the learning that takes place within both the workplace and the broader area of “leisure time” activity. It presents a challenge to all teachers: to review their learning facilitation strategies.
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Emotive Word Portfolio? — A Case Study on the Change of Portfolio Assignments in the Field of Religious Education

Alexander van Dellen, University of Innsbruck, Austria

Abstract

The starting point for the case study at hand is the implementation of new curriculum requirements as a result of the recent adjustment of the “Catholic Religious Education” Bachelor and Master Degree programs to meet the European Union’s Bologna Process criteria. Consequently, portfolios can no longer be used as the basis for the final examination, as they have been until now. Following a description of the underlying problems related to the different types of portfolios and their use in teacher education training, the starting situation of portfolio assignment will be examined. Finally, the findings of the evaluation by students will be presented in order to draw conclusions for a new portfolio concept.
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The Effects of a Teaching Development Program for New Academics on Their Teaching Practice

Magdalena Jara, Pontifical Catholic University, Chile

Abstract

This paper reports on the evaluation of a Program for Academic Induction in Teaching (PIAD), which is carried out every year at PUC for new academic staff. The program introduces new teachers to student-centred active pedagogy with the aim of developing their teaching practice, particularly their planning skills, teaching methodologies, and learning assessment methods. The evaluation of the program shows that the goals were achieved and that the participants were satisfied with the sessions. A further study is currently being carried out to identify the potential effects of the program on their teaching planning, methodologies and assessment methods. The preliminary results of this study will be presented here.
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