Reflection on Action: A Scholarly Activity to Ensure Quality in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: The Case of Universidad de La Serena

Pamela Labra,* Rodrigo Fuentalba Jara, Ana María Vera, Jorge Fernández Labra, José Enrique Novoa, Jorge Pizarro Guerrero, Erika Zuñiga Fuentes, Claudia Toledo Robles, Oscar Robles González, Patricia Cortés Maldonado, Eric Troncoso Riquelme, Hernán Guiñez Guiñez, Luis Cortés Estrada, Moises Villablanca Villanueva, Ana María Villagrán Barrios, & Erico Wulf Betancourt, Universidad de La Serena, Chile

Abstract

Improving professional development in higher education is of vital importance, especially when seen in the context of (a) the increase in the number of students entering the university system in Chile who are insufficiently prepared for their studies, and (b) the increase in the number of higher education faculty hired to teach for the first time. The present study aims at summarizing the experience of the Teaching Center at the Universidad de La Serena in providing faculty with institutional
support to reflect on their teaching, i.e., to undertake a scholarly examination of the teaching-learning process in higher education.
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The Applicability of Speech Act Analysis to Course Evaluation: A Small-Scale Pilot Study

Alison Devine, Edge Hill University, UK

Abstract

The current paper has both a substantive and methodological focus. Substantively, it finds that the online discussion board postings of students enrolled on a postgraduate certificate in teaching and learning display evidence of students’ applying course studies in their workplace, but that these displays are mostly limited to comments regarding their own physical activities and (affective) approaches, rather than any attempt to disseminate their learning any more widely. Methodologically then, this paper argues that speech act analysis (SAA) can be of partial use to the course evaluator who is seeking evidence of an impact on practice as one means of triangulating data, but that there are three types of evidence of impact on practice apparent in the students’ online postings and a detailed understanding of these types can aid in enhancing student learning.
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Models for Success Initiative: Evidence Based Learning in a Latino Community

Edith Esparza-Young, Texas A&M University, USA

Abstract

This paper examines the use of evidence-based learning to adapt and modify teaching practices to best serve the needs of pre-service teachers during the induction period. Research has shown that the attrition and retention rates of teachers during the first four years are at odds. The data collection consists of archived self-reflections by the participants along with university personnel, public school officials, mentoring teachers, and professors.
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The Art and Science of Design Education in a New College of Architecture

Christina Joy Hoehn & Hans Peter Wachter, University of Oklahoma, USA

Abstract

Educating today’s design students goes beyond the standard walk and talk of the traditional classroom. Environments that nurture and promote collaboration and integration of technology are becoming a standard, critical for students emerging from the design academy. This paper will discuss the design of a college of architecture at the academy that must promote and foster the concepts of interdisciplinary collaboration, teaming and technology integration. A well-conceived facility creates an environment that will generate students that are ready to enter the design industry at a competitive level after graduation. Creative facility design promotes and enriches inclusive learning in a technologically-based educational discipline.
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historia.scribere: Publications from the Ivory Tower for More Quality in Student Papers and Better Occupational Perspectives

Eva Pfanzelter, University of Innsbruck, Austria

Abstract

historia.scribere is an online journal project of three historical institutes at the University of Innsbruck. The journal works with editorial peer review, including both BA-/MA- and PhD- students and faculty from the three departments in the review process. One of the goals of the project is to improve the quality of seminar papers using the extensive feedback students receive. The main focus of the project, however, is to involve students in the scholarly publication process so that they can acquire essential online publication skills, thus qualifying them for the primary job markets for historians: journalism and publishing.
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Re-Engineering the Teaching and Learning Process with Specific Reference to Management Education

Lakshmivarahan Ramasubramani, Acharya Bangalore B School, India

Abstract

More often, the decision makers from the industry are not all that delighted when they visit management education institutes for placement. The industry, the institute, and the students can be treated as sides of an equilateral triangle. All three are equally responsible for this kind of scenario. The author proposes a thorough revamp of the entire process, which would start with reverse communication from industries to institutes and meaningful participation from industries. The author also proposes more fun and humor-filled teaching. An attempt is made in this paper to study in detail the various re-engineering practices that can be adopted to change the way we look at management education, especially with respect to the Indian scenario.
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“Please Sir, I Want Some More” – MORE! Oliver Twist in the 21st century

Andrew Sackville Edge Hill University, UK

Abstract

Are resources for learning really diminishing? Where does most of our learning take place? What are the resources we actually use? This paper questions the conventional views of “diminished resources”, “learning” and “resources” and argues for the recognition of the learning that takes place both within and outside the workplace. Using two small case studies from very different areas – clinical education and heritage learning – the paper focuses on the learning that takes place within both the workplace and the broader area of “leisure time” activity. It presents a challenge to all teachers: to review their learning facilitation strategies.
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Evidence-Based Learning: Three Institutions and Three Teaching Firms Together Prepare Students to Succeed

Hans-Peter (Hepi) Wachter, University of Oklahoma, USA

Abstract

Evidence-based learning (EBL) is not foreign to the teaching in a design school. Very much related to the EBL concept is the engagement in environmental design problems, which require students to analyze and synthesize a problem in the built environment. This paper will argue that design students immersed in collaborative, evidence-based learning (CEBL) are, after completing the learning experience, more highly motived and better prepared problem solvers than traditional cognitive learners and that such students integrate better what they know. The project discussed emanates from multi-disciplinary design collaboration between architecture students and interior design students at the University of Oklahoma and from faculty and resources of the Texas A&M University and the College of Architecture at the SE University in Nanjing, China. Each of the three universities has a close relationship with a working architectural firm that was involved in the process. Using a professional project and engaging design professionals from the participating firms as advisers, clearly shifted the teaching approach toward evidence-based learning. One single synchronous guest lecture series, available through video conferencing to all participants, minimized organizational efforts, cost, and sustainability in the classroom and insured a single focus on content. The contacts each institution had to affiliated teaching firms and practitioners brought a wealth of expertise into the classroom and enriched student learning otherwise too difficult to accomplish.
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An Initial Certificate of Teacher Development: the UNAB Experience

Roberto Espejo, Mariana Ahumada, Guido Fuentealba, Carolina Cáceres, Carolina Pino, & Mauricio González-Suarez, Universidad Andrés Bello, Chile

Abstract

In this paper we present the experience of the training team in university pedagogy at the Andrés Bello University (Chile) concerning the design and implementation of an initial certificate of teacher development. This certificate is awarded following the completion of three courses: “Planning and Syllabus Design,” “Active Methods for Learning,” and “Pedagogic Strategies in Virtual Environments.” Each course is intended to promote a standpoint wherein teachers consider students as individuals who can take control of their own learning, considering methodological strategies as well as up-to-date materials and contents. In our paper we also discuss assessment and follow-up work for this process.
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Improving Graduateness and Employability: A Career Management Approach

Kethamonie Naidoo, Council on Higher Education, South Africa

Abstract

Universities are under increasing pressure to produce the kind of graduates that employers want and employers often report that graduates do not possess the desired attributes for employment (Glover et.al. 2002: 293; Parker & Griesel, 2009; Chetty, 2012; Keeling & Hersh, 2012). Universities are exploring different options to make graduates more “work ready” for a wider variety of work contexts. The challenge for universities is to systematically plan to improve graduateness in a pedagogically sound way within the curriculum. This paper draws on the view of Bridgstock (2009) who explains that in a rapidly changing knowledge intensive and technologically advancing economy, students require more than a set of graduate attributes that are desirable to employers in the immediate future. The focus should instead be on developing in graduates the attributes that would best serve them, employers and society for the longer term and be relevant for future decades. Bridgstock (2009:32) identifies self-management and career management skills as necessary graduate attributes that would allow graduates to “proactively navigate the world of work and self-manage the career building process” regardless of the dynamically changing and unpredictable work contexts. The key concepts, graduate attributes, graduateness, employability and career management are explained and thereafter, the use of a career management portfolio as a pedagogically sound, systematic and strategic approach for improving graduateness are explained. Some implications of implementing such an approach are also considered.
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