Computer Ethics: Its Necessity and Its Integration into the Curriculum

Marion Ben-Jacob,* Department of Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Mercy College, USA

Abstract

Technological advances of this millennium have enabled enhanced learning experiences for students. Technology has and continues to be integrated into the educational environment from many perspectives and to different degrees. However, to facilitate the appropriate use of the power of technology in student learning, we need to integrate the study of computer ethics into the curriculum. This paper addresses the importance of computer ethics and discusses methodology and pedagogy that support student engagement, student-faculty teamwork, student assessment of the quality of the instruction, and the learning of this essential subject.

Keywords: student engagement, assessment, instructional technology, academic integrity

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Ivory Tower to Lighthouse Beacon: Extreme Makeover, Academe Edition: Practical Suggestions for Adopting a Newly Assessed Course

Valarie Meliotes Arms, Drexel University, USA

Abstract

English teachers have long recognized that “authentic” assignments involving real world tasks produce better writing because students see the immediate purpose. With the help of an enthusiastic IT group and a willing, though occasionally “reluctant” and skeptical faculty, I synthesized much of my research on pedagogy and classroom experience to develop English Alive: A Hybrid Learning Community for students from all majors. English Alive provides a multi-pronged approach to engaging students with technology that allows for data gathering necessary for assessment. We focus on authentic assignments drawn from the professions and the use of the full range of 21st century communication technology. We have reduced teacher class time in favor of more student online writing time and first hand experiences. The program is built on ‘projects” that require students to recognize the value of primary and secondary research in something as basic as describing a local community. The class also emphasizes the techniques for clarity in communication, whether the final project is a presentation, a poster or an essay.
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A New Interface as a Teaching Element in a General Course on Control Systems

Minekazu Moriishi, Norisada Uji, Aya Inaura, Hiroshi Yokoyama, & Hirotaka Uoi,
Osaka Electro-Communication University, Japan

Abstract

In the “Control by Computer Program” course taught at the Osaka Electro-Communication University, students are expected to master a control system that consists of actuators, sensors, and a computer interface. But in real-world control systems there are many interfaces — so many that students cannot recognize them easily. In this study, a new, more easily understood, physically separated and visualized interface has been developed by the authors. In addition, the authors have tested the new interface in the course and confirmed its usefulness.
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Multi-Level Knowledge Transfer in a Blended Learning Environment

Birgit Pitscheider, University of Innsbruck, Austria

Abstract

The possibilities offered by Web 2.0 tools and methods in teaching environments have the potential to change the traditional, mostly unidirectional form of knowledge transfer. Today, students come to class with a strong background in internet-based tools and can enrich the teaching/learning environment, if they are provided with the opportunity, the structures, and the motivation to do so. This paper describes a self-reinforcing knowledge and skills transfer framework in a blended-learning business communication class. Firstly, knowledge transfer occurs on several levels (teacher — student, student — student, student — teacher, student — IT administration team, etc.). Secondly, the framework develops its own dynamics and generates a new quality of knowledge transfer that necessitates a redefinition of the teacher’s role as a primary knowledge transfer agent.
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Doing More with Less?: A Case Study of Gaining Efficiencies through Alignment of SoTL and Strategic Planning for Learning and Teaching

Mark Schofield, Edge Hill University, UK

Abstract

In challenging economic times practices should be informed by research and SoTL, integrated into strategic planning. Such thinking informs this case study which comprises Edge Hill University’s approaches to efficiency and doing “more with less resource,” whilst managing associated risks. Elements include the SOLSTICE concept of learning design in interdisciplinary Technology Enhanced Learning teams; efficient harvesting of curriculum design approaches though “Learning Task Teams” and galvanizing developmental advice and guidance though an Excellence Fellowship Scheme.
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Preparing and Publishing Wikipedia Articles as Training Tool in Project Management, Teamwork, and the Peer-Review Publishing Process in the Life Sciences

Thorsten Schwerte, Stefan Stolz, & Elisabeth Kugler, University of Innsbruck, Austria

Abstract

Besides accurate research, other important skills for which training is required in today’s universities include project management, teamwork, and writing. The availability of Internet sources and word-processing software has changed the way students conduct research and write up their documents. The basic tasks of the student writer has to be focused in synergy with these new possibilities—i.e. by doing well-designed (literature) research and presenting it clearly and accurately, while following accepted academic standards for citation, style, and format. In our paper we present the attempt to use Wikipedia article publication as a model for student training in teamwork, project
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eLearning for Students by Students

Carol Wakeford, Sam Clarke, Kate Hilton, Dan Levin, & Ian Miller, University of Manchester, UK

Abstract

Research projects enable students to experience first-hand the excitement and challenges that are power for the course. Increasing student numbers has put pressure on faculties to diversify the range of projects on offer, whilst maintaining the essential qualities inherent in student-lead research. These include discipline-based plus transferrable skills, like critical and creative thinking, problem solving, communication and project management. eLearning Projects involve the design, construction and evaluation of online resources to support aspects of the undergraduate curriculum, such as practicals, assessments or key concepts. Students are supported in seminars and workshops based on active and collaborative learning. This paper describes student project work in which students design, create, pilot and evaluate elearning resources to support the teaching, research or public engagement activities of their project supervisor. Although the projects featured here support the biosciences, the format is transferrable across the disciplines, so, as technology moves forward, student elearning projects provide a vehicle to renew and refresh online materials.
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